The Year in American Soccer - 1982

Written by David Litterer spectrum@sover.net

NASL | ASL | MISL | National Team | International Club Tours | The College Game | Other Action


North American Soccer League (Div. 1)

A greatly reduced NASL took to the field for the 1982 season. Six teams had folded after the indoor season, leaving just 14 to compete in the spring. The league was reorganized into three divisions, but still played a 32 game schedule. Having blinked in the showdown with the USSF and FIFA, the NASL dropped its 35 yard offside line, and reduced the number of substitutions from three to two to meet FIFA standards. However, they kept the sudden death and shootout tiebreakers. The league expanded their system of encouraging American & Canadian player development. Now at least seven members of each team had to be American or Canadian and at least two must be on the field at all times. This was diluted somewhat as a number of players simply became naturalized citizens. Although this expanded playing opportunities somewhat, many of the domestic players were still primarily substitutes and bench warmers.

The exodus of international stars continued, losing the services of George Best, Clive Charles, Paul Child, Charlie Cooke, John Cruyff, Steve David, Oscar Fabbiani, Jorgen Kristiansen, Gerd Muller, Jose Velazquez, and Frank Worthington. Cruyff had actually returned to Europe early in the 1981 season, being totally disgusted with the hard artificial turf found in 2/3 of the NASL stadia. A few stars came the other way, particularly with the Toronto Blizzard, whose new coach Bob Houghton signed Swedish goalkeeper Jan Moller, and Jimmy Nichol of Northern Ireland as he embarked on a major revival of the Blizzard. Also coming to the NASL was Archie Gemmill, who signed with the Jacksonville Tea Men.

In the regular season, it was once again the New York Cosmos and Montreal Manic finishing 1-2 in the East, with Toronto surging back over .500 on the strength of the scoring feats of Neill Roberts, Ace Ntsoelengoe, and David Byrne. Giorgio Chinaglia continued his scoring feats for the Cosmos, becoming the highest scorer in NASL history, leading the league with 55 points, and placing second with 20 goals. The main success story of the year was the Ft. Lauderdale Strikers who took the Southern Division, albeit with a paltry 18-14 record, and a 64-74 Goals for-goals against record. On paper, it was Tulsa who looked strongest, but they couldn't score when it counted and had finished an even .500 in the standings. The Western Division had the closest race in recent years, with Seattle, San Diego and Vancouver finishing within 6 points of each other. Given that a win was six points, this was close indeed. This race also showed clearly the idiosyncrasies of the shootout and bonus point scoring system: Vancouver actually had the best won-loss record at 20-12, with San Diego 19-13 and Seattle 18-14, yet Seattle won the division because of the bonus points it had earned for regulation wins and high scoring; they had beaten Vancouver in goals scored 72-48.

The odd results meant little in the playoffs, as a division title gave little more than bragging rights. In the playoffs, once again there were few surprises, although some series were fairly evenly matched. The Cosmos had to go the distance to oust Tulsa, as did the Seattle Sounders as they ended Toronto's comeback season. Vancouver came up short against division rival San Diego, as they were defeated 5-1 and 2-1 after beating the Sockers 1-0 at home. The Cosmos took care of the Sockers in the semis, by identical 2-1 scores, although San Diego didn't give up until forcing the cosmos into overtime. The Ft. Lauderdale-Seattle series was much closer; after taking the first game 2-1, the Strikers were forced into overtime where they succumbed to a goal from Kenny Hibbitt, and lost 4-3. The final was a beauty for purists, as they won a defensive contest 1-0. Soccer Bowl 1982 moved to San Diego for the first time, pitting the New York Cosmos against the Seattle Sounders in a rematch of Soccer Bowl '77. Unlike the previous match, there was no Pele or Beckenbauer to excite the crowds, and no local team to root for; the combatants and the host literally came from three corners of the country. Only 22,634 fans showed up to watch the game, which was another classic defensive contest, with the net only filled by a lone goal from Giorgio Chinaglia, to give the Cosmos their fifth league title.

The exhibition friendlies continued apace in 1982, although there were fewer full tours; teams generally traveled to play a pair of games, and then return. The NASL teams generally won more, but they were playing weaker opposition than in years past, making the victories somewhat pyhrric. A notable series was the Europac Tournament, held in May, in which the Manchester United squad lost a pair of matches to Seattle (3-0) and Vancouver (3-1). Hedjuk Split came away with a victory and a draw. The Cosmos made a far east tour after the season, sweeping six games against the Victoria All-Stars and the South Korean and Japanese national teams.

The Transatlantic Challenge Cup returned for its third season. The Chicago Sting, 1981 Soccer Bowl champions, and the New York cosmos, 1981 regular season leader and 1980 & 1981 TACC titlist, represented the NASL. Napoli of Italy Serie 'A', and Nacional of Uruguay, the 1981 World Club champion finished the pool. The series was launched May 26, 1982 before 28,887 at giants stadium in east Rutherford, NJ, as Napoli and the Cosmos battled to a 2-2 draw. The next day, Nacional and the Sting drew 0-0. On May 29, the Cosmos defeated Nacional and Chicago defeated Napoli by identical 3-1 scores, leading to the championship doubleheader, where Napoli defeated Nacional 3-0 and the Chicago Sting defeated New York 4-3 to take their first title. Unlike the first two years, even this popular event failed to drat large crowds this season.

The league's future continued to look bleak after this season. For the first time, attendance took a serious dive, from 14,060 to 13,156 per game, and this was doubly alarming, because these were the strongest NASL teams reflecting this loss, the weaker teams having already folded. Edmonton and Portland folded, while Jacksonville bolted the league to seek out better fortunes in the American Soccer League. The Jacksonville move must have been galling to the NASL which had considered itself the first thing in American soccer. This continued after the 1982 season, as Portland, Even the successful teams couldn't sustain fan interest, as the novelty had worn off and fewer high-caliber players remained. It was beginning to look like a downward spiral; lack of quality players drove away fans which increased financial losses which made it impossible to keep the remaining players, let alone recruit new ones. The increasingly bitter salary war with the Major Indoor Soccer League was taking an increasing toll, and the MISL saw an opportunity to force the older league out of business and have the field for themselves. Unfortunately, it was also clear that even high attendance with star players was not enough to make the league financially viable; some other system had to be established, but for the NASL it was too late to adapt to a plan that could be financially viable in the long run.

                 Final NASL League Standings, 1982

Before the season, Toronto changed their nickname to the Blizzard.

                           G    W   L   GF  GA  PTS    %     Att.   
     	Eastern Division
New York Cosmos            32  23   9   73  52  203  .718  28,749
Montreal Manic             32  19  13   60  43  159  .593  21,348
Toronto Blizzard           32  17  15   64  47  151  .531   8,185
Chicago Sting              32  13  19   56  67  129  .406   9,377

     	Southern Division
Fort Lauderdale Strikers   32  18  14   64  74  163  .562  12,345
Tulsa Roughnecks           32  16  16   69  57  151  .500  14,469
Tampa Bay Rowdies          32  12  20   47  77  112  .375  18,507
Jacksonville Tea Men       32  11  21   41  71  105  .343   7,160

     	Western Division
Seattle Sounders           32  18  14   72  48  166  .562  12,539
San Diego Sockers          32  19  13   71  54  162  .593   8,532
Vancouver Whitecaps        32  20  12   58  48  160  .625  18,254
Portland Timbers           32  14  18   49  44  122  .437   8,786
San Jose Earthquakes       32  13  19   47  62  114  .406  11,012
Edmonton Drillers          32  11  21   38  65   93  .343   4,922

1st Round:        New York defeated Tulsa 5-0, 0-1, 1-0
                  Seattle defeated Toronto 4-2, 1-2, 4-2
                  Ft. Lauderdale defeated Montreal 2-3, 1-0(OT), 4-1
                  San Diego defeated Vancouver 5-1, 0-1, 2-1.
Semi-Finals:      New York defeated San Diego 2-1, 2-1(OT)
                  Seattle defeated Ft. Lauderdale 0-2, 4-3(OT), 1-0.
SOCCER BOWL-82:  New York defeated Seattle 1-0.

Transatlantic Cup Champion:  Chicago Sting

After the season, Jacksonville, Portland and Edmonton folded.

Leading Scorers                 GP    G    A   TP   Min  SHS    F
Giorgio Chinaglia, New York     32   20   15   55  2912  174    9
Karl-Heinz Granitza, Chicago    32   20    9   49  2836  127   44
Peter Ward, Seattle             32   18   13   49  2908  123   45
Ricardo Alonso, Jacksonville    30   21    4   46  2510  114   57
Laurie Abrahams, Tulsa          31   17   10   44  2690   85   33
Neill Roberts, Edmonton/Toronto 28   17    8   42  2367   71   45
Ace Ntsoelengoe, Toronto        32   14   12   40  3151   79   39
Mark Peterson, Seattle          31   17    5   39  2603   64   49
David Byrne, Toronto            32    8   23   39  2901   73  108
Godfrey Ingram, San Jose        31   17    3   37  2802  109   22
Alan Willey, Montreal           29   15    7   37  2471   73   38
Branko Segota, Ft. Lauderdale   29   12   13   37  2495  150   48
Brian Kidd, Ft. Lauderdale      23   15    6   36  2019   90   33
Luis Fernando, Tampa Bay        31   16    3   35  2695  115   29
Ade Coker, San Diego            20   13    9   35  1307   47   21
Steve Moyers, New York          28   13    9   35  1898   66   20
John Bain, Portland             32   12   11   35  2491   60   27
Lorenz Hilkes, San Diego        27   11   13   35  2075   94   35
Gordon Hill, Montreal/Chicago   31   11   13   35  2781  123   17
Steve Hunt, New York            22    9   15   33  1936   42  141
Arno Steffenhagen, Chicago      28   13    6   32  2457   53   31
Franz Gerber, Tulsa             27   11   10   32  2097   61   20
Steve Daley, Seattle            27    7   18   32  2494   70   37
Vladislav Bogicevic, New York   31    4   24   32  2759   47   42
Dale Mitchell, Portland         30   10   11   31  2466   94   49
Ron Futcher, Portland           23   13    4   30  1953   86   79
Ray Hankin, Vancouver           27   11    8   30  2419   97   83
Peter Lorimer, Vancouver        28   10   10   30  2577   83   50
Thompson Usiyan, Montreal       28   10   10   30  2463   91   50

Leading Goalkeepers (1700 mins. needed to qualify)
                                GP   Min   SV   GA   SH   GAA
Tino Lettieri, Vancouver        27  2506  418  130   34  1.23
Victor Nogueira, Montreal       19  1654  205   66   23  1.25
Paul Hammond, Seattle           32  3001  433  135   43  1.29
Bill Irwin, Portland            25  2761  361  122   34  1.32
Jan Moller, Toronto             30  2751  365  143   42  1.37
Volkmar Gross, San Diego        28  2563  509  178   40  1.40
Hubert Birkenmeier, New York    28  2552  412  180   44  1.55
Winston DuBose. Tulsa           32  2960  539  159   55  1.67
Mike Hewitt, San Jose           30  2727  509  164   55  1.82
Dieter Ferner, Chicago          28  2579  487  165   58  2.02

Most Valuable Player:  Peter Ward, Seattle Sounders
Coach of the Year:  John Giles, Vancouver Whitecaps
Rookie of the Year:  Pedro DeBrito, Tampa Bay Rowdies

NASL All-Star Team - 1st Team

G - Hubert Birkenmeier     New York Cosmos
D - Frantz Mathieu         Montreal Manic
D - Young Jeung Cho        Portland Timbers
D - Peter Nogly            Tampa Bay Rowdies
D - Andranik Eskandarian   New York Cosmos
M - Vladislav Bogicevic    New York Cosmos
M - Ace Ntsoelengoe        Toronto Blizzard
M - Arno Steffenhagen      Chicago Sting
F - Giorgio Chinaglia      New York Cosmos
F - Peter Ward             Seattle Sounders
F - Ricardo Alonso         Jacksonville Tea Men

The Indoor Season, 1981-82

After the dust settled from the Crash of the Franchises, 13 teams took to the field for the indoor season. The league was realigned into American and National conferences with two divisions each, although these could have just as easily been labeled Eastern and western conferences. Despite the loss of many players to the MISL for the winter, attendance was up slightly, and the season was spiced up by very close races in the American East and Central divisions. Ironically, every team in the central finished above .500, while none of the East teams did so. San Diego and Edmonton finished atop their National divisions, while Montreal took the East and the Chicago Sting continued their indoor dominance in the central. The Cosmos, so successful outdoors finished last in the east, although they drew a respectable 8,600 fans.

In the playoffs, Tampa bay, Tulsa, San Diego and Edmonton were victors in their first round series. Tampa Bay needed three games to get past the Roughnecks in the semifinals, winning 5-4, losing 3-4 and taking the final game 1-0. San Diego trounced the Drillers 8-2 and 12-3, before taking the indoor title 9-7 and 10-5 over the Tampa Bay Rowdies. This marked the beginning of the Sockers' extraordinary run of indoor league titles that would continue right through the end of the major Indoor Soccer League in 1992.

                  Final NASL Indoor League Standings, 1981-82

                            G   W   L   GB    %   GF   GA     Att. 
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
     	East Division
Montreal Manic             18   9   9   --  .500   93  97   9,152
Toronto Blizzard           18   8  10    1  .444   86  96   5,142
Jacksonville Tea Men       18   7  11    2  .389   86 106   6,375
Cosmos                     18   6  12    3  .333  102 123   8,690

     	Central Division
Chicago Sting              18  12   6    -- .667  139 117  13,322
Tampa Bay Rowdies          18  11   7    1  .611  121 113   5,334
Tulsa Roughnecks           18  10   8    2  .556  128 103   5,308

NATIONAL CONFERENCE
     	West Division
San Diego Sockers          18  10   8    -- .556  147 110   7,047
Portland Timbers           18   7  11    3  .389   86 103   5,061
San Jose Earthquakes       18   5  13    5  .278   83 141   2,843

     	Northwest Division
Edmonton Drillers          18  13   5    -- .722  133  91   2,949
Vancouver Whitecaps        18  10   8    3  .556   93  94   2,943
Seattle Sounders           18   9   9    4  .500   95  97   6,456

First Round:  Tulsa d.Chicago 2-1 (5-4, 6-7, 3-1)
              Tampa Bay d. Montreal 2-1 (8-7 ot, 2-3, 2-1 3ot)
              Edmonton d.Seattle 2-0 (8-6, 12-4)
              San Diego d.Vancouver 2-0 (4-3, 8-4)
Semi-finals:  Tampa Bay d.Tulsa 2-1 (5-4, 3-4, 1-0)
              San Diego d.Edmonton 2-0 (8-2, 12-3)
CHAMPIONSHIP: San Diego d.Tampa Bay 2-0 in NASL Championship Series 
              (9-7, 10-5) March 3, 8, 1982

   Leading Scorers              GP   G   A   TP
Julie Veee, San Diego           17  51  38  140
Karl-Heinz Granitza, Chicago   17  35  36  106
Jan Goossens, Edmonton         18  42  18  102
Giorgio Chinaglia, New York    17  35  20   90
Kai Haaskivi, Edmonton         18  26  31   83
Gordon Hill, Montreal          15  29  18   76
Barry Wallace, Tulsa           17  21  25   67
Ingo Peter, Chicago            18  13  41   67
Alan Hudson, Seattle           17  12  43   67
Chris McGrath, Tulsa           18  25  13   63
Zequinha, Tampa Bay            18  19  23   61

Leading Goalkeepers   (Min. 540 minutes to qualify)
                            G  Min  Svs  GA  GAA

Blagoje Tamindzic, Toronto  18 1045  312  90  5.17
Arnie Mausser, Jacksonville 17 1020  251  88  5.19
John Baretta, Edmonton      17  905  244  80  5.30
Dieter Femer, Chicago       14  714  204  69  5.35
Paul Hammond, Seattle       10 1024  242  93  5.41
Tino lettieri, Vancouver    11  655  189  62  5.68
Volkmer Gross, San Diego    18  880  303  88  6.00
Jurgen Stars, Tampa Bay     11  663  191  68  6.15
David Brcic, New York       14  739  228  78  6.33
Keith McRae, Portland       10  601  158  65  6.49 


American Soccer League (Div. 2)

The ASL had a distinct southern flavor this season. The Cleveland Cobras moved to Atlanta, becoming the Georgia generals, and expansion teams were launched in Oklahoma City and Nashville. The Carolina Lightnin' had completed a highly successful first season highlighted with enthusiastic fan support, highlighted by two crowds f over 8,000. The championship game, held in Charlotte drew over 20,000. With Rodney Marsh as head coach, and all-star Scott Manning and NASL veteran Paul Child on the roster, they looked well equipped for a successful second season. The Georgia Generals were founded by Walt Russell, who saw the lingering fan support after the demise of the NASL's Chiefs. Starting with no money, no players and no stadium, Walt, a self-described "sports nut" assembled a team from scratch in five months, and compiled an impressive 12-9-4 record in his first season. The was headed by former Atlanta Chiefs head coach David Chadwick, and included three former Chiefs, goalkeeper Graham Tutt, defender Mike Balsom, and Midfielder Danny Payne, as well as Forward Jose Neto, a standout from California/San Diego. The Generals played at DeKalb Stadium in the suburbs, a venue that would be familiar to Atlanta Silverbacks fans of the late 1990's. The Nashville Diamonds, headed by Ralph Woerheide, the majority owner of baseball's Nashville Diamonds, hoped to capitalize in the rapidly growing interest in sports in this burgeoning city. The roster was assembled primarily of recent college graduates and semi-pro club team players.

The ASL dispensed with divisions this season, having only seven teams. The Detroit express won the regular season title in a close race with the surprising Oklahoma City Slickers. the Slickers were the most successful of the expansion clubs, primarily because of the strength of their veteran roster which includes international NASL veterans Phil Parkes and Jeff Bourne. Pennsylvania Stoners saw their successful run come to an unexpected end, falling to 6th place.

The playoffs started with the withdrawal of the Pennsylvania Stoners, giving Georgia a bye to the semifinals. Carolina meanwhile passed the Rochester Flash 3-1. The semifinals were two-game series with goal differential. Oklahoma defeated the Carolina Lightnin' 2-1 and 3-0, bringing the Lightnin's season to a disappointing end, and Detroit won on goal differential after defeating Georgia 2-1 and losing 0-1. The championship was won by the Detroit Express 1-3, 1-0 and 4-1. Total attendance for the championship series was 33,762. Thus, a professional league soccer trophy was brought to the Motor City for the first time.

The league had begun the season with high hopes and averaged 4,450 fans per game, but ended with yet more disappointment. Two of the new teams, Nashville, and Georgia folded after disappointing seasons, and Rochester withdrew for one season to regroup. By the time they were reorganized, the league had folded, and Rochester ended up joining the new United Soccer League in 1984. By now, even to party stalwarts, it must have been apparent that the venerable league was nearing its end. One last chance would be made to revive the ASL, but the economic signs were not good.

                   Final League Standings, 1982

Before the season, Oklahoma and Nashville were added.  Cleveland moved to 
Georgia. (GF/GA info as of 8/26/82.)  

                           G    W   T   L   GF  GA  PTS
Detroit Express            28  19   4   5   37  59  144
Oklahoma City Slickers     28  19   3   6   58  42  138
Georgia Generals           28  12   4   9   55  40  115
Carolina Lightnin'         28  11   4  13   37  45   99
Rochester Flash            28  10   2  15   48  53   84
Pennsylvania Stoners       28   8   5  13   34  44   81
Nashville Diamonds         28   3   4  21   25  67   41

1st Round         Carolina defeated Rochester, 3-1
                  Georgia defeated Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania withdrew)
Semi-Finals:      Oklahoma defeated Carolina, 2-1, 3-0
                  Detroit defeated Georgia, 2-1, 0-1
CHAMPIONSHIP:     Detroit defeated Oklahoma, 1-3, 1-0, 4-1 (attendance 33,762).

After the season, Georgia and Nashville folded.  Rochester suspended 
operations for one year and joined the USL in 1984.  League attendance 
averaged 4,450 for this season.

                               G   A   Pts
Brian Tinion, Detroit        22  15   59
Andy Chapman, Detroit        23   6   52
Jeff Bourne, Oklahoma City   20   8   48
Billy Boljevic, Detroit      13  14   40
Jose Neto, Georgia           15   4   34
Kevin Fouser, Georgia        11   6   28
Ernie Buriano, Rochester      9   6   24
Pat Fidelia, Carolina         8   3   19
Solomon Hilton, Pennsylvania  6   6   16
Franco Paonessa, Rochester    6   5   17
Clyde Watson, Detroit         6   5   17

Leading Goalkeepers   (Min. 1100 minutes to qualify)
                            G  Min  Svs  GA  SO  W-L-T  GAA
Tad Delorm, Detroit       27 2480  156  36   7 18-5-4  1.24
Phil Parkes, Oklahoma City 28 2767  147  42   8 19-6-3  1.36
George Taratsides, Penn.   18 1700   96  27   5  7-7-4  1.48
Scott Manning, Carolina    28 2620  142  45   7 10-14-4 1.54
Graham-Tutt, Georgia       16 1494   53  26   1  8-3-4  1.56
Fred Armstrong, Nashville  12 1120   83  29   2  2-9-1  2.33
Brian McInerney, Nashville 13 1230  123  35   1 0-10-2  2.57

Most Valuable Player:  Brian Tinnion, Detroit Express
Coach of the Year:  Brian Harvey, Oklahoma City Slickers
Rookie of the Year:  Franco Paonessa, Rochester Flash
General Manager of the Year:  Jim Walker, Oklahoma City Slickers


Major Indoor Soccer League

The MISL completed building its franchise base for its fourth season. The league continued establishing their franchise base after the conclusion of the season. San Francisco moved to Kansas City where they became the Comets, Hartford moved to Memphis and the Pittsburgh Spirit were reinstated. A cross-town Gotham rivalry was established with the addition of the New Jersey Rockets who were based in the new Meadowlands Arena. The season expanded once again, to 44 games. Now with thirteen teams, the league was realigned into two divisions.

This was a season of superlatives; on December 4, the New York Arrows defeated Phoenix 15-10 in the highest scoring MISL game ever, and on February 14, Baltimore's Keith Van Eron scored the first ever goal by a goalkeeper. On the field, the New York Arrows continued to dominate the East, with an amazing 36-8 record, once again on the leadership of leading scorer Steve Zungul and Omar Gomez. Zungul scored 103 goals this year, an incredible feat considering only two other players scored more than 55. The Arrows also had one of the best defenses in the league, only allowing 199 goals, bested only by the St. Louis steamers, who won the Western Division.

The Pittsburgh Spirit came back from hiatus in force, compiling a 31-13 record, good enough for second place in the East. Perhaps the biggest disappointment was the Cleveland force who barely escaped the cellar in the east, and featured a strong roster. Bringing up the rear in the West was the relocated Kansas City Comets, an inauspicious start for a team that would go on to provide some impressive performances later in the decade.

In the playoffs, the Pittsburgh Spirit were upset by Baltimore in a close series, but otherwise the spoils went to the favored teams, as New York, St. Louis and Wichita advanced. Same story in the semifinals as New York defeated the Blast 6-5 and 6-2, and St. Louis defeated Wichita 10-5, 6-7 and 4-1, leading the divisional champs into the final round. The championship series was best of . five, and they needed all five games to win this slugfest. The Arrows lost their first game 2-3 in overtime before charging back 5-3, and taking the series lead in a nailbiter which saw the teams take an 8-8 deadlock into overtime. St. Louis evened the score in the follow-up 6-4, leading to the final showdown. Even here, the result was close, and only at the end did the Arrows pull away for an 8-6 victory and their fourth consecutive title. Pundits might have been justified in calling this the New York Arrows Soccer League; 12 other teams were out in the cold as far as the final gold was concerned. Yet little did anyone know that within a year, the Arrows would be history, driven into bankruptcy by the excesses of the MISL/NASL salary war which was rapidly taking a toll on both sides.

The post-season awards illustrated one of the oddities of the indoor game, the melding of playing roles; unlike the outdoor game, players often mixed offensive and defensive roles. hence, a forward, Val Tuksa, was named defender of the Year, and scoring powerhouse Steve Zungul landed a midfielder role on the all-star team, after being named to the team as a forward in previous seasons. After the season, Denver and New Jersey suspended operations, but the league compensated by expanding to the west coast, with the Los Angeles Lazers. They also provided indoor membership to the NASL's San Diego Sockers, who were committed to indoor soccer, but were dissatisfied with the NASL's haphazard indoor season. As it turns out, the NASL suspended their indoor season for 1982-83, and as a result, the league also accommodated the NASL's Chicago Sting and Golden Bay Earthquakes (formerly San Jose) into their season.

                     Final MISL League Standings, 1981-82

Before the season, New Jersey was added.  Hartford moved to 
Memphis and San Francisco moved to Kansas City.  Pittsburgh 
resumed operations.

                            G   W   L   GF  GA  GB    %   
     	Eastern Division
New York Arrows            44  36   8   302 199 --  .818
Pittsburgh Spirits         44  31  13   254 208  5  .705
Baltimore Blast            44  27  17   223 207  9  .614
Buffalo Stallions          44  24  20   276 244 12  .545
New Jersey Rockets         44  17  27   195 230 19  .386
Cleveland Force            44  15  29   205 250 21  .341
Philadelphia Fever         44  11  33   175 250 25  .250

     	Western Division
St. Louis Steamer          44  28  16   228 182 --  .636
Wichita Wings              44  27  17   235 200  1  .614
Memphis Americans          44  20  24   250 271  8  .455
Denver Avalanche           44  19  25   182 203  9  .432
Phoenix Inferno            44  17  27   222 254 11  .386
Kansas City Comets         44  14  30   174 223 14  .318

1st round:     Baltimore defeated Pittsburgh 1-3, 6-5(OT), 6-2.  
               New York defeated Buffalo 7-9, 5-4 (OT), 10-6.  
               St. Louis defeated Denver 4-2, 7-6.  
               Wichita defeated Memphis 3-5, 6-3, 12-3.
Semi-Finals:   New York defeated Baltimore 6-5 (OT), 6-2.  
               St. Louis defeated Wichita 10-5, 6-7 (OT), 4-1.
CHAMPIONSHIP:  New York def. St. Louis 2-3(OT), 5-3, 9-8 (OT), 4-6, 8-6.

After the season, New Jersey and Denver suspended operations.

All-Star Game:  Western Division defeated Eastern Division 9-5.  
(At Memorial Auditorium Buffalo, att: 13,426.  MVP = Tony Glavin)

Leading Scorers                GP   G   A   TP

Steve Zungul, New York         40 103  60  163
Stan Terlecki, Pittsburgh      43  74  43  117
Stan Stamenkovic, Memphis      36  46  47   93
Steve David, Phoenix           44  58  23   81
Paul Child, Pittsburgh         44  52  29   81
Omar Gomez, New York           40  40  36   76
Keith Furphy, Cleveland        44  50  25   75
Joe Fink, Baltimore            43  51  22   73
Germain Iglesias, Buffalo      44  46  25   71
Don Ebert, St. Louis           44  52  19   71
Tony Carbogani, Memphis        43  39  35   65
Dave MacWilliams, Philadelphia 39  29  36   65
Jorgen Kristensen, Wichita     39  14  51   65
Mike Laschev, Buffalo          34  36  28   64
George Nanchoff, Phoe/Clev     45  34  27   61
Tony Glavin, St. Louis         35  34  21   55
Bill Nichol, Pittsburgh        44  26  29   55
Helmut Dudek, Memphis          43  34  20   54
Paul Kitson, New York          38  33  21   54
Charlie Carey, Denver          40  42  12   54

LEADING GOALKEEPERS   (Min. 1200 minutes to qualify)

                             GP   Min. Shts  Svs   GA   W-L  GAA
Slobo Ilijevski, St. Louis   36  2103  1756  798  135  24-11  3.85
Keith Van Eron, Baltimore    32  1664  1212  535  110  18-12  3.97
Krys Sobieski, Pittsburgh    29  1498  1069  485  105   19-7  4.20
Van Taylor, Phoenix          29  1217   879  329   89   10-8  4.39
Mike Dowler, Wichita         37  2149  1453  695  162  22-14  4.52
Shep Messing, New York       27  1652  1012  461  125   21-6  4.54
Alan Mayer, New Jersey       27  1527  1101  471  116   8-16  4.56
Aly Anderson, Denver         32  1785  1322  526  143  13-18  4.81
Paul Coffee, Philadelphia    32  1718  1286  636  154   7-23  5.21
Enzo DiPede, Kansas City     32  1769  1266  636  154   7-21  5.22
Paul Maxi, Buffalo           32  1551  1041  456  146  14-13  5.65
John Houska, Cleveland       32  1652  1313  473  151  18-18  5.48
Bill Mishalow, Memphis       27  1402  1259  550  129  10-13  5.52
 
Most Valuable Player:  Steve Zungul, New York Arrows, Stan Terlecki, Pittsburgh Spirit
Coach of the Year:  David Clements, Denver Avalanche
MISL Scoring Champion:  Steve Zungul, New York Arrows
MISL Pass Master (most Assists):  Steve Zungul, New York Arrows
Defender of the Year:  Val Tuksa, New York Arrows
Goalkeeper of the Year:  Slobo Ilijevski, St. Louis Steamers
Rookie of the Year:  Germain Iglesias, Buffalo Stallions
Championship Series Player of the Year:  Steve Zungul, New York Arrows

All-MISL team:

G - Slobo Iljevski, St. Louis  Steamer
D - Stan Terlecki, Pittsburgh Spirit
D - Stan Stamenkovic, Memphis Americans
M - Steve Zungul, New York Arrows
F - Val Tuksa, New York Arrows
F - Helmut Dudek, Memphis Americans


The US National Team

The senior national team was virtually inactive this year, only briefly assembling for a friendly at Trinidad & Tobago, a game the Americans won from goals by Ricky Davis and Julie Veee. In September, the USSF named Karl-Heinz Heddergot director of coaching, replacing Walter Chyzowych. At this point, the USSF started promoting the US as a potential site for World Cup 1986, as a replacement for Colombia which had been forced to withdraw for financial reasons. Although FIFA was skeptical, the US had in its favor a large number of potential host stadiums and extensive infrastructure that would be amenable to holding an event of this magnitude.

With the Olympics in 1984, and the possibility of the World Cup in 1986, the USSF began hashing out new proposals for building up the National Team into a world-class organization. The USSF revived an earlier idea which had been shelved in 1976, that of creating a full-time squad, known as Team America. This team would employ the best of the American players on a full-time salary, and the proposal was to have the team play a full NASL season as a league franchise, and supplement that with 10-15 international matches. This way, the players would get the full-time training they would need to perform successfully at the international level. As 1982 drew to a close, an unprecedented alliance between the USSF, NASL, MISL, ASL and sponsors have been successfully formed to see this dream to fruition. For now, the future looked promising.

On a brighter note, the US made their best international tournament showing ever in the 1982 CONCACAF U-20 championship where they made it to the championship game before losing to Honduras 1-0 (see below in "other action".)

            USA National team results (full internationals only)

    1982 Totals:  1W,  0D,  0L
Mar 21 82  W 2-1  Trinidad                   Port of Spain, Trinidad
               Davis, Veee


International Club Tours


Ft. Lauderdale Strikers March 25, 1982 - March 30, 1982. Record: 3 wins, 0 losses, 0 draws

   3/25/82 Ft. Lauderdale Strikers      3 at Violette (Haiti)             0
   3/27/82 Ft. Lauderdale Strikers      1 at Racing Club (Haiti)          0
   3/30/82 Ft. Lauderdale Strikers      2 at Violette Racing All-Stars    1

Malmo (Sweden) March 25, 1982 - March 30, 1982. Record: 1 wins, 2 losses, 0 draws

   3/25/82 Malmö (Sweden)               2 at Seattle Sounders             3
   3/28/82 Malmö (Sweden)               0 at Vancouver Whitecaps          1 Spring Cup Matches, Vancouver
   3/30/82 Malmö (Sweden)               1 at New York Cosmos              0 Spring Cup Matches, Vancouver

Europac Tournament May 17, 1982 - May 20, 1982.

   5/17/82 Hajduk Split (Yugoslavia)    0 at Seattle Sounders             3 Europac Tournament
   5/18/82 Manchester United (England)  1 at Vancouver Whitecaps          3 Europac Tournament
   5/20/82 Hajduk Split (Yugoslavia)    2 at Vancouver Whitecaps          2 Europac Tournament
   5/20/82 Manchester United (England)  0 at Seattle Sounders             3 Europac Tournament

New York Cosmos October 17, 1982 - November 10, 1982. Record: 6 wins, 0 losses, 0 draws

  10/17/82 New York Cosmos              3 at Victorian All-Stars          2
  10/28/82 New York Cosmos              2 at South Korea National Team    1 in Jeung Jo, S. Korea
  10/30/82 New York Cosmos              1 at South Korea National Team    0 in Masan, S. Korea
   11/3/82 New York Cosmos              3 at Japanese National Team       1 in Omiya, Japan
   11/7/82 New York Cosmos              3 at Japanese National Team       1 in Kobe, Japan
  11/10/82 New York Cosmos              1 at Japanese National Team       0 in Tokyo, Japan

Ft. Lauderdale Strikers October 29, 1982 - November 3, 1982. Record: 3 win, 0 draws, 0 losses.

  10/29/82 Ft. Lauderdale Strikers      2 at Jamaican National Team       0
  10/31/82 Ft. Lauderdale Strikers      2 at Macaupa (Brazil)             0
   11/3/82 Ft. Lauderdale Strikers      2 at Montego Select All-Stars     1


The College Game

In 1982, after the merger of the NCAA and the AIAW, the NCAA instituted a national championship for its new, but rapidly growing women's program. This tournament, with 12 teams saw the beginning of North Carolina's Dynasty, as the 1981 AIAW champion took the inaugural NCAA national title. The NCAA also expanded the Men's Division 1 tournament to the interesting size of 23 teams, and the Division 2 tournament was expanded from 10 to 12 teams.

In the NCAA Division 1 tournament, third round action saw Connecticut defeat LIU-Brooklyn 1-0 on penalty kicks. Duke defeated George Mason 2-0, Indiana defeated Philadelphia textile 2-0, and SIU-Edwardsville defeated San Francisco 1-0. In the semifinals, Duke defeated Connecticut 2-1 and Indiana defeated SIU-Edwardsville 1-0. The Championship match as held in Ft. Lauderdale, FL, on December 11, and Indiana defeated Duke 2-1 in a record EIGHT overtimes 2-1 to take the national championship.

In the NCAA Division 2 tournament, third round action saw Missouri-St. Louis defeat Cal state Dominguez Hills 2-0. Southern Connecticut defeated Bridgeport 4-1, Oakland defeated Southern Indiana 1-0, and Florida International defeated Tampa 4-1. In the semifinals, Southern Connecticut defeated Missouri-St. Louis 2-1 and Florida International defeated Oakland 3-2 in overtime. The championship was held in Miami, FL on December 4, where Florida International defeated Southern Connecticut State 2-1 to take the national title.

In the NCAA Division 3 tournament, third round action saw UNC-Greensboro defeat Plymouth State 2-1 in double overtime. Cortland State defeated Buffalo State 1-0, Bethany (WV) defeated Wheaton (RI) 2-1 and Scranton defeated Messiah 2-0. In the semifinals, UNC-Greensboro defeated Cortland State 1-0 in overtime, and Bethany (WV) defeated Scranton 2-0. The championship was held on November 28 in Greensboro, NC, where UNC-Greensboro took the national title 2-1 over Bethany (WV).

In the NCAA Women's tournament, second round action saw Connecticut defeat Cortland State 2-0 in overtime. Central Florida defeated Massachusetts 2-1, North Carolina defeated Princeton 4-0 and Missouri-St. Louis defeated Harvard 2-1. In the semifinals, Central Florida defeated Connecticut 3-1, and North Carolina defeated Missouri-St. Louis 2-1. The championship was held in Orlando, Florida. The Third place game was taken by Connecticut 2-1, and on November 21, North Carolina took the inaugural NCAA women's national championship 2-0 over Central Florida.

NAIA Championship: Simon Fraser defeated Midwestern State 4-0.

NJCAA Men's Championship: Mercer County Community College 1, Lewis & Clark C. C. 0

NJCAA Women's Championship: Monroe Community College 2, SUNY-Morrisville 1

NCCAA Championship: Concordia College (NY)

Coaches' Final Division 1 Poll:

1.  Duke
2.  LIU-Brooklyn
3.  San Francisco
4.  Philadelphia textile
5.  Indiana
6.  Virginia
7.  Clemson
8.  SIU-Edwardsville
9.  Connecticut
10. George Mason

College All-Americans:

G - Skip Gilbert, Vermont
D - Lou Karbeiner, Penn State
D - Erik Nelson, San Francisco
D - Adubarie Otorobio, Clemson
D - Joseph Ulrich, Duke
F - Matthew English, Akron
F - Tom Killeen, Philadelphia Textile
F - Kevin Maher, Yale
F - Steve MacLean, Philadelphia Textile
F - Neil Ridgeway, Bowling Green
F - Roy Wegerle, Southern Florida

Hermann Trophy: Joseph Ulrich, Duke

NSCAA Division 1 Coach of the Year: John Rennie, Duke


Other Action

1982 US Open Cup Final: On June 26, New York Pancyprian Freedoms (CSL) defeated Los Angeles Maccabee 4-3.

1982 National Amateur Cup Final: Seattle Croatia SC defeated Virginia Kicks 1-0.

James P. McGuire (National Junior Men's) Cup: Annandale (VA) Boys Club

Athena (National Junior Women's) Cup: Sting, Dallas

CONCACAF Champions Cup: Brooklyn Dodgers and New York Pancypriot Freedoms played, but did not advance. U.N.A.M. (Mexico) defeated Robin Hood (Suriname) 2-1 to win the title.

CONCACAF U-20 Championship: The US was quite successful this time around. After beating Puerto rico 5-0, drawing 0-0 with Jamaica and defeating Guatemala 3-1, they advanced to the second round. A 3-0 victory over Canaada and a 0-0 draw with Costa Rica gave them that group, and they defeated Guatemela 3-1 in the semifinals. In the final, Honduras beat the USA 1-0. This was the USA's best showing yet in a CONCCACAF tournament.

National Soccer Hall of Fame: In 1982, John O. Best, Joseph Carenza, and Lamar Hunt were inducted into the National Soccer Hall of Fame. Nels Dahlquist, and William Tkach were inducted into the National Intercollegiate Soccer Officials Association Hall of Fame.


Last update: August 15, 2012

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