DENNIS SCHWARTZ Movie Reviews

 
THAT SINKING FEELING (director/writer: Bill Forsyth; cinematographer: Michael Coulter; editor: John Gow; music: Colin Tully; cast: Robert Buchanan (Ronnie Monroe), Tom Mannion (The Doctor), Billy Greenlees (Wal), Gordon John Sinclair (Andy), John Hughes (Vic), Eddie Burt (Eddie the Driver), Alex Mackenzie (The Tramp), Douglas Sannachan (Simmy), Danny Benson (Cop), Derek Miller (Bobby), Eric Joseph (The Wee Man), Alan Love (Alex), Margaret Adams (Gang Girl), Kim Masterton (Gang Girl), Richard Demarco (Himself), Gerry Clark (Watchman), James Ramsey (Alan), Janette Rankin (Mary), Drew Burns (Pete); Runtime: 87; MPAA Rating: PG; producer: Bill Forsyth; 2Entertain Video-PAL DVD format; 1980-UK)

"A witty, gentle, breezy, low-brow, low-key comedy about a bungling motley crew of bored unemployed loveable Glasgow youths resorting to robbery to help out their dire economic situation."

Reviewed by Dennis Schwartz 

The debut feature film of Scotch filmmaker Bill Forsyth ("Local Hero"/Gregory's Girl"/"Being Human") is a witty, gentle, breezy, low-brow, low-key comedy about a bungling motley crew of bored unemployed loveable Glasgow youths resorting to robbery to help out their dire economic situation. The street-smart caper comedy film is well-acted by the nonprofessional members of the Glasgow Youth Theatre.

Ronnie (Robert Buchanan), Wal (Billy Greenlees), Andy (Gordon John Sinclair) and Vic (John Hughes) are unemployed and miserable, so much so the Glasgow lads contemplate suicide. Their dim-witted but gung-ho leader Ronnie discovers there's a warehouse in their neighborhood that stocks stainless steel sinks and he schemes to steal 90 or so sinks through his inventive but simplistic non-violent plan and will divide the sinks up among the eight or so gang members. To keep the nightwatchman (Gerry Clark) off their backs, Vic and Wal disguise themselves as flirty women, to get a truck to haul away the stolen goods chemistry student Bobby (Derek Miller) drugs the bakery driver (Eddie Burt) he works for with his homemade potion and others are recruited in secrecy to carry out the sinks. After the successful heist, problems arise on how to unload the hot goods.

Though messy and awkward at times, it wins the viewer over with its off-beat charm and calculated observations of the slackers. 

REVIEWED ON 11/20/2012       GRADE: B

Dennis Schwartz: "Ozus' World Movie Reviews"

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